Minority Report: Challenging the Homogenizing Stereotypes that Asian-American Students Face

April 10, 2014

Since arriving at Columbia, being “Asian” has meant something different to me than what it meant growing up in Karachi and London. There, the term referred exclusively to South Asians: people of Pakistani, Indian, Bangladeshi, or Sri Lankan descent. Still, before I came to Columbia as an international student, I knew that “Asian,” in the collective American imagination, was generally mapped onto East and Southeast Asians.

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Complicated relationship: Asian-Americans and affirmative action

March 13th, 2014

Laurel Directo was just 4-years-old when race-conscious admissions were banned from California’s public universities in 1998.  Now 20, and attending UCLA, Directo doesn’t think schools should go back to using affirmative action.  “I would hope they would admit us on based on our merit and achievements, and not, you know, our race,” Directo said. Still, she recognizes the advantage she had as the daughter of Filipino engineers who sent her to good schools in Irvine.

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Data on Asian-American and Pacific Islander students conceal major disparities

March 11, 2014

Current methods of collecting and reporting data on Asian-American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) student populations conceal significant disparities in educational experiences and outcomes. said UCLA professor of education Robert Teranishi, who recently released a report produced in partnership with the White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders and the Educational Testing Service.

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National Study Led by Robert Teranishi Reveals Underserved AAPI Student Populations

March 11, 2014

UCLA Professor of Education Robert Teranishi recently released a report that examines how current methods of collecting and reporting data on the Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) student populations conceal significant disparities in educational experiences and outcomes. The report, which is titled, “iCount: A Data Quality Movement for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in Higher Education,” was a product of a partnership with the Educational Testing Service (ETS) and the White House Initiative on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. The report was released last summer at a national symposium hosted by the U.S. Department of Education and the National Commission on Asian American and Pacific Islanders in Education, a project for which Professor Teranishi is Principal Investigator.

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Six professors recognized for contributions to education

January 15, 2014

Six faculty members of the UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies were included on this year’s list of “RHSU Edu-Scholar Public Influence Rankings” published by Education Week. Those recognized are Marcelo Suárez-Orozco (dean of UCLA’s Graduate School of Education and Information Studies), Patricia Gándara (professor of education and co-director of the UCLA Civil Rights Project/Proyecto Derechos Civiles), Eva Baker (distinguished research professor and co-director of the UCLA Center for Research on Evaluation Standards and Student Testing (CRESST)), Gary Orfield (professor of education and co-director of the UCLA Civil Rights Project/Proyecto Derechos Civiles), Mike Rose (research professor in the UCLA Education Social Research Methodology Division (SRM)) and Robert Teranishi (professor of education and co-director of the Institute for Immigration, Globalization and Education at UCLA).

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Data Disaggregation: Taking CARE of the Model Minority Myth

July 10, 2013

Asian American and Pacific Islanders (AAPI) students exist in an interesting place, especially in the context of higher education. On one hand, they are often grouped together with White students because of their perceived success as a group, however, one cannot deny that they encounter the same struggles that their Black and Latino/a counterparts have to deal with as well. AAPI students often have to battle this Model Minority Myth.

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Federal Funding Could Help Universities Attract More AANAPI Students

July 1, 2013

In 2008, the federal government launched a program to allow some universities to identify themselves as Asian-American, Native American and Pacific Islander-Serving Institutions (AANAPISI). However, according to Ronald Roach of Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, of the 153 schools around the country that qualify for the designation, only 78 have applied for it and received it so far. And of those winning the designation, only 21 actually received federal grants that are supposed to help recruit and retain Asian-American and Pacific Islander students.

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